ISO 17025 ACCREDITED, 72-HOUR TURNAROUND AVAILABLE1

SC Labs employs reliable hemp testing methods to verify the safety and purity of your consumer-ready products.

 Pre-Harvest Testing

With over two years of testing industrial hemp and 10 years testing cannabis, we can help you navigate the pre-harvest testing process and remain in compliance.

 Hemp Potency Testing

Using ISO 17025 accredited testing methods for cannabinoids and terpenes, we can provide clarity into product potency and offer guidance for quality and consistency.

 Safety Testing

Whether biomass, refined cannabidiol (CBD), or a finished product, SC Labs can test a range of hemp products for pesticides, residual solvents, microbiological contaminants, and heavy metals.

Hemp Pre-Harvest Testing

SC Labs has been servicing hemp cultivators with pre-harvest testing in Oregon for over two years. This experience—coupled with a decade of testing cannabis in California—allows us to provide one of the most comprehensive testing programs for hemp compliance in the United States.

SC Labs offers pre-harvest testing in California and Oregon only.

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Hemp Laboratory Test Certificate of Analysis

Hemp Potency Testing

Our ISO 17025 accredited methods qualify 15 cannabinoids (∆9THC, ∆8THC, THCA, THCV, THCVA, CBD, CBDA, CBDV, CBDVA, CBG, CBGA, CBL, CBN, CBC, and CBCA) via high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV), and over 35 terpenoids via gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID).

Hemp Safety Testing

Although federally legal, hemp regulations and procedures for cultivation, processing, and sale continue to evolve. With a range of relevant safety tests, SC Labs can help you test for many harmful substances and contaminants: heavy metals, microbiologies, mycotoxins, Pesticides, Residual Solvents, and shelf stability testing (water activity and pH).

SC Labs meets testing guidelines recommended by the United States Hemp Authority and the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia (AHP).

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Hemp flower, oil, seeds, and capsules

Test Many Types of Products

SC Labs tests all types of matrices in the hemp supply chain—including biomass, refined extracts, and finished products:

Raw Hemp
Biomass
Crude Oil
CBD Distillate
CBD Isolate

CBD Cartridges
Water Soluble CBD
Nano-emulsified CBD
Infused Products

Test Results are Just the Beginning

Built custom for the cannabis business flow, SC Labs was one of the first labs to offer an interactive, web-based customer portal to contextualize your results, run historical reports, download certificates, produce marketing materials, and much more.

Read More

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INDUSTRIAL HEMP FAQs

No. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, effective January 1, 2019, removed hemp from Schedule I of the federal Controlled Substances Act. Thus, hemp is no longer federally regulated as a controlled substance.

SEC. 10114. INTERSTATE COMMERCE.

(b) TRANSPORTATION OF HEMP AND HEMP PRODUCTS.

—No State or Indian Tribe shall prohibit the transportation or shipment of hemp or hemp products produced in accordance with subtitle G of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 (as added by section 10113) through the State or the territory of the Indian Tribe, as applicable.

Read the 2018 Farm Bill.

  U.S. Government Publishing Office. “Text – H.R.2 – 115th Congress (2017-2018): Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.” Congress.gov, 2018, https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2/text, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

Effective June 6, 2019, the Postal Service™ is revising Publication 52, Hazardous, Restricted, and Perishable Mail, to add new section 453.37, “Hemp-based Products,” which provides new mailing standards for products derived from cannabis and industrial hemp.

Read the original postal bulletin.

  United States Postal Service. “Publication 52 Revision: New Mailability Policy for Cannabis and Hemp-Related Products” USPS.com, 2019, https://about.usps.com/postal-bulletin/2019/pb22521/html/updt_002.htm, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

AB-228 Clarified Language About Hemp-CBD as an Adulterant

Section 110611 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

110611.

Except as provided in Section 25621.5 of the Business and Professions Code, a food or beverage is not adulterated by the inclusion of industrial hemp, as defined in Section 11018.5, or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp. The sale of food or beverages that include industrial hemp or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp shall not be restricted or prohibited based solely on the inclusion of industrial hemp or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp.

Section 111691 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:

111691.

A cosmetic is not adulterated because it includes industrial hemp, as defined in Section 11018.5, or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp. The sale of cosmetics that include industrial hemp or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp shall not be restricted or prohibited based solely on the inclusion of industrial hemp or cannabinoids, extracts, or derivatives from industrial hemp.

  California Legislature—2019-2020 Regular Session. “AB-228 Food, beverage, and cosmetic adulterants: industrial hemp products.” California Legislative Information, 2019, https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200AB228, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

CALIFORNIA HEMP FAQs

California law does not currently provide for a permit or license for the manufacturing, processing, or selling of non-food industrial hemp or hemp products.

The Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC) is responsible for regulating commercial cannabis licenses for retailers, distributors, microbusinesses, testing laboratories, and temporary cannabis events. For information regarding selling products in licensed cannabis retail stores, contact BCC.

The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) states hemp will follow pesticide regulations outlined for cannabis.

  California Department of Pesticide Regulation. Pesticide Use on Cannabis, 13 Oct. 2016, https://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/county/cacltrs/penfltrs/penf2017/2017atch/attach0301.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

All growers of industrial hemp for commercial purposes must register with the county agricultural commissioner prior to cultivation. Registration applications are available through the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) on their Industrial Hemp Program webpage.

Yes, please provide the following items before shipping your first sample:

  1. State issued ID
  2. Pre-harvest Certificate of Analysis (COA)
  3. Signed HEMP liability document (if COA not available)

§ 4920. List of Approved Seed Cultivars.

(a) The Secretary, as provided in Section 81002 of the Food and Agricultural Code, adopts the following list of approved seed cultivars.

(1) Industrial hemp seed or propagative materials certified as breeder, foundation, registered, or certified seed or stock by one of the following agencies:

(A) Member organizations of the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies,

(B) Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, or

(C) An officially approved and recognized seed-certifying agency listed in Title 3, California Code of Regulations, Section 3875, as provided in Section 52401 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

(2) Industrial hemp seed or propagative materials produced in a quality assurance program approved by one of the following agencies:

(A) Member organizations of the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies,

(B) Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, or

(C) An officially approved and recognized seed-certifying agency listed in Title 3, California Code of Regulations, Section 3875, as provided in Section 52401 of the Food and Agricultural Code.

(3) Industrial hemp seed or propagative materials produced by an authorized participant in a state industrial hemp agricultural pilot program, pursuant to Section 7606 of the federal Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. Sec. 5940).

(A) The crop from which the seed or propagative materials were harvested from shall have been tested in accordance with a testing method approved by the regulatory authority in the state of origin and found to have no more than threetenths of one percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on a dry weight basis.

(B) The commissioner shall be notified of the importation of all propagative materials into the county. The shipment is subject to inspection by the commissioner and shall not be used for cultivation until released by the commissioner (California Food and Agricultural Code Division 4, Part 2, Chapter 2 § 6401 and § 6501).

(4) Industrial hemp seeds or tissue culture plants imported from outside the United States that meets federal importation requirements.

(A) The crop from which the seeds or tissue culture plants were harvested from shall have been tested in accordance with a testing method approved by the department of agriculture in the country of origin and found to have no more than three-tenths of one percent THC on a dry weight basis.

(B) The commissioner shall be notified of the importation of all propagative materials into the county. The shipment is subject to inspection by the commissioner and shall not be used for cultivation until released by the commissioner (California Food and Agricultural Code Division 4, Part 2, Chapter 2 § 6401 and § 6501).

(C) For the purposes of this section, the term “tissue culture” means in vitro material introduced into culture from nodal cuttings at a particular time and from a single plant and grown in aseptic conditions to be used as a source of propagative material.

(5) Industrial hemp seed or propagative materials produced in California in accordance with the provisions of Division 24 of the Food and Agricultural Code and this chapter.

(A) The crop from which the seed or propagative materials were harvested from shall have been tested by a department-approved laboratory and found to have no more than three-tenths of one percent THC on a dry weight basis.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “List of Approved Seed Cultivars.” California Code of Regulations, 18 Mar. 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/industrialhemp/docs/ccr_4920_list-approved-seed-cultivar_ADA.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

Please provide the following items before requesting a pre-harvest test:

  1. CDFA Industrial Hemp Grower License
  2. The THC sampling must be completed at least 30 days prior to harvest and crop must be flowering.

§4940 Sampling Timeframe & Pre-Harvest Notification for Industrial Hemp

(a) Sampling Timeframe.

(1) Sampling shall occur no more than 30 days before harvest.

(2) Any changes to the harvest date may require additional testing for THC content prior to harvest.

(b) Sampling Request and Pre-Harvest Report.

(1) In order to request sampling, registrants shall submit a pre-harvest report to the commissioner at least 30 days before harvest to initiate the sampling process. The pre-harvest report shall include the:

(A) registrant’s registration number,

(B) name and contact information of the registrant,

(C) anticipated harvest date,

(D) name of the seed cultivar(s),

(E) physical address, Global Positioning System coordinates, general description of the location, and acreage of the crop,

(F) Name and contact information of the laboratory to conduct the testing for THC content.

(2) The commissioner, or a third-party sampler designated by the commissioner, shall schedule a sampling date within 30 days of the anticipated harvest date.

(3) Registrants shall notify the commissioner of any changes to the above information no less than 5 calendar days prior to the scheduled sampling date.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “Industrial Hemp Sampling and Testing.” California Code of Regulations, 10 June 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/docs/IH4940-1/Text-of-the-Regulation-IH4940-1.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

§4942 Approved Testing Method for Testing Industrial Hemp for THC Content

(a) Sample Preparation.

(1) The laboratory shall maintain chain of custody upon receiving the samples.

(2) Each composite sample shall be maintained and tested separately for THC content.

(3) All parts of the plant included in the composite sample shall be processed and tested as a single sample. No plant parts shall be removed during the sample preparation and testing.

(4) All parts of the plant included in the composite sample shall be dried until the weight of the composite sample remains constant after drying intervals. Drying temperature must not exceed 90 degrees Celsius. Dried composite samples shall be milled to a homogenous powder-like consistency and combined before analysis

(b) Suitable analytical instrumentation used to determine THC content in industrial hemp includes the following:

(1) Gas chromatography with flame ionization detector

(2) Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

(3) Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

(4) Liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detector

(c) Analytical instrumentation used must be able to establish a validated limit of quantification (LOQ) of one-tenth of 1 percent or lower for total THC content.

(d) Sample Retention.

(1) If the laboratory test report indicates a percentage content of THC that is equal to or less than three-tenths of 1 percent, the laboratory shall retain the sample for a minimum of 30 days from the testing date.

(2) If the laboratory test report indicates a percentage content of THC that is greater than three-tenths of 1 percent and does not exceed 1 percent, the laboratory shall retain the sample for a minimum of 60 days from the testing date.

(3) If the laboratory test report indicates a percentage content of THC that exceeds 1 percent, the laboratory shall retain the sample for a minimum of 90 days from the testing date.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “Industrial Hemp Sampling and Testing.” California Code of Regulations, 10 June 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/docs/IH4940-1/Text-of-the-Regulation-IH4940-1.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

§4941 Sampling Procedures for Testing Industrial Hemp for THC Content

(a) Collection of Samples.

(1) Samples for THC testing shall be collected by the commissioner, or a third-party sampler designated by the commissioner.

(2)  The commissioner, or designated sampler, shall verify that the sample collection site corresponds to the registered location using GPS coordinates prior to the collection of the samples.

(3)  The registrant must be present to observe the collection of samples and allow the commissioner, or designated sampler, access to all industrial hemp plants within the registered land area and all areas and facilities used for cultivation.

(b) Sample Volume and Composition

(1) Each primary sample shall include all parts of the plant, including stems, stalks, flowers, leaves, seeds, and buds from:

(A) If two or more lateral branches are present, the terminal 18 inches of the top lateral branch and terminal 18 inches of one lateral branch from the lower one-third of the plant. If any branch is less than 18 inches, the whole branch shall be taken.

(B) If two lateral branches are not present, the terminal 18 inches from the terminal bud at the top of the plant. If the plant is less than 18 inches tall, the whole plant shall be taken.

(2) A composite sample shall consist of at least five primary samples from different plants.

(3) A separate composite sample shall be taken for:

(A) Each cultivar within each contiguous field, and

(B) Indoor and outdoor growing areas shall be treated as separate fields.

(4) When feasible, the commissioner, or designated sampler, should not collect samples within 10 feet of field edges.

(c) Handling of Samples.

(1) All plant material collected for a composite sample shall be placed together in a permeable bag, and kept in a manner not conducive to mold growth.

(2) The bag containing the composite sample shall be sealed and labeled in a manner to detect tampering and ensure chain of custody. Sample labels shall be signed by both the registrant and the commissioner or designated sampler.

(3) Samples shall be labeled with a unique sample identification number and accompanied by the following documentation:

(A) The registrant’s proof of registration,

(B) The pre-harvest report,

(C) Seed certification documentation for the seed cultivar used,

(D) The THC testing report for each certified seed cultivar used, and

(E) A sample analysis request form with chain of custody information provided by the testing laboratory.

(4) Samples shall be delivered to the testing laboratory within 24 hours of collection. The testing laboratory shall document the chain of custody by signing the sample label upon receiving the sample. A copy of the signed chain of custody documentation shall be provided by the testing laboratory to the commissioner or designated sampler.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “Industrial Hemp Sampling and Testing.” California Code of Regulations, 10 June 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/docs/IH4940-1/Text-of-the-Regulation-IH4940-1.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

§4950 Destruction of non-compliant industrial hemp crops

(a)  Any industrial hemp crop that does not meet the requirements of Division 24 of the Food and Agricultural Code and this chapter shall be destroyed in a manner approved by the commissioner:

(1) Unless otherwise specified in 4946(b), any non-compliant industrial hemp crop shall be destroyed as soon as practical, but no later than 45 days after the registrant’s receipt of notification of abatement from the commissioner.

(b)  The grower of the industrial hemp crop shall submit a destruction plan to the commissioner at least 24 hours prior to the start of the destruction. The destruction plan shall include the:

(1) Registration number, if applicable;

(2) Name and contact information of the grower;

(3) Anticipated destruction date(s) of the crop to be destroyed;

(4) Name of the cultivar(s) and unique sample identification number(s), if applicable;

(5) Physical address, Global Positioning System coordinates, general description of the location, and acreage of the crop to be destroyed; and

(6) Proposed destruction method.

(c) The proposed crop destruction method shall be approved by the commissioner prior to the start of the destruction.

(d) The commissioner shall confirm the destruction of the crop by conducting inspections.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “Industrial Hemp Sampling and Testing.” California Code of Regulations, 10 June 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/docs/IH4940-1/Text-of-the-Regulation-IH4940-1.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

§4950.1 Voluntary Destruction of Industrial Hemp Crops

(a) Any industrial hemp grower that wishes to voluntarily destroy a crop shall do so in a manner approved by the commissioner.

(b) The grower of the industrial hemp crop shall submit a destruction plan to the commissioner at least 24 hours prior to the start of the destruction. The destruction plan shall include the:

(1) Registration number, if applicable;

(2)  Name and contact information of the grower;

(3)  Anticipated destruction date(s) of the crop to be destroyed;

(4)  Name of the cultivar(s) and unique sample identification number(s), if applicable;

(5)  Physical address, Global Positioning System coordinates, general description of the location, and acreage of the crop to be destroyed; and

(6) Proposed destruction method.

(c) The proposed crop destruction method shall be approved by the commissioner prior to the start of the destruction.

(d) The commissioner shall confirm the destruction of the crop by conducting inspections.

  California Department of Food and Agriculture. “Industrial Hemp Sampling and Testing.” California Code of Regulations, 10 June 2019, https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/docs/IH4940-1/Text-of-the-Regulation-IH4940-1.pdf, Accessed 25 Aug. 2019.

OREGON HEMP TESTING FAQs

Growers can grow and harvest hemp. Handlers can buy hemp from growers to process into commodities or products

No. You must have a grower or handler registration in addition to the agricultural hemp seed producer registration.

Additional registration is needed for those wishing to produce or handle agricultural hemp seed. The agricultural hemp seed production registration must accompany either a grower or handler registration and is an option on both applications to include.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture only administrates Oregon law. Check with your lawyer and any states you will pass through, as well as your destination state.

SC Labs offers pre-harvest testing in Oregon. The guidelines to this service is outlined in the linked PDF here:

https://www.sclabs.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Hemp-Oregon-Pre-Harvest-IS-MKT0004.pdf

  1. Excludes samples received Sunday.

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